Available Sessions


WAITING LIST FOR PRESIDENTIAL ACADEMY 14, MARCH 14, 2020 (SATURDAY), KEDC LEXINGTON

Session Description

THIS SESSION IS FULL AS OF DEC. 2.  PLEASE REGISTER HERE TO BE PLACED ON A WAITING LIST. YOU WILL BE NOTIFIED IN ORDER OF REGISTRATION IF ANY OF THOSE CURRENTLY ENROLLED, UNENROLL.

Session Name

PRESIDENTIAL ACADEMY 14, MARCH 14, 2020 (SATURDAY), KEDC LEXINGTON

Description

KEDC  LEXINGTON
C= Content-Specific Pedagogy   TS= Teaching Strategies     SE= Student Engagement

PLEASE NOTE LINK TO MATERIALS BELOW (PLEASE DOWNLOAD AND BRING DEVICE FOR USE DURING SESSION OR PRINT IF THAT IS YOUR PREFERENCE).  ALSO, PLEASE FOLLOW THE REGISTRATION LINK BELOW IN ADDITION TO REGISTERING HERE TO ENSURE OUR PRESENTERS HAVE YOUR INFORMATION.

I.  Teaching American History - TBD
Title:  Civil War and Reconstruction (Testing the  Limits)     

The Civil War and Reconstruction was arguably one of the most catastrophic and defining events in American history. For Lincoln, the sole purpose was to preserve the Union.  His assassination set in motion a model of Reconstruction that differed from his expressed vision. This seminar will look at the war, broadly defined, the role Emancipation played and its effects on Reconstruction.

Link to Materials and Agenda:

Session Times

Start TimeEnd TimeLocationCurrent StudentsMax Students
March 14 2020 09:00 AMDecember 16 2019 04:00 PMKEDC LEXINGTON1920

WAITING LIST PRESIDENTIAL ACADEMY 15 - MARCH 28, 2020 (SATURDAY), KEDC LEXINGTON

Session Description

PRESIDENTIAL ACADEMY 15 - MARCH 28, 2020 (SATURDAY), KEDC LEXINGTON

Description

KEDC LEXINGTON
C= Content-Specific Pedagogy   TS= Teaching Strategies     SE= Student Engagement

I.  Dr. B. Fitzpatrick, MSU (C)
Title:The Irish in America
1 ½ HRS - AM
 
This session will examine the impact of Irish immigration on society, politics, and culture from the nation’s founding to the rise of the Gilded Age.  Moreover, the session will examine how the Irish, targeted by nativists in the 1840s and 1850s, rose to political dominance in major cities such as Chicago and New York by the turn of the twentieth century. 
                                                                                                                                                         
II.   Deb Cullen, SREB (TS)
Title:  Project-Based Learning

III.  Student Engagement - TBD

Session Times

Start TimeEnd TimeLocationCurrent StudentsMax Students
March 28 2020 09:00 AMMarch 28 2020 04:00 PMKEDC LEXINGTON825

PRESIDENTIAL ACADEMY 15 - MARCH 28, 2020 (SATURDAY), KEDC LEXINGTON

Session Description

KEDC LEXINGTON
C= Content-Specific Pedagogy   TS= Teaching Strategies     SE= Student Engagement

I.  Dr. B. Fitzpatrick, MSU (C)
Title:The Irish in America
1 ½ HRS - AM
 
This session will examine the impact of Irish immigration on society, politics, and culture from the nation’s founding to the rise of the Gilded Age.  Moreover, the session will examine how the Irish, targeted by nativists in the 1840s and 1850s, rose to political dominance in major cities such as Chicago and New York by the turn of the twentieth century. 
                                                                                                                                                         
II.   Deb Cullen, SREB (TS)
Title:  Project-Based Learning

III.  Student Engagement - TBD


Session Times

Start TimeEnd TimeLocationCurrent StudentsMax Students
March 28 2020 09:00 AMMarch 28 2020 04:00 PMKEDC LEXINGTON5050

PRESIDENTIAL ACADEMY 16 - APRIL 3, 2020 (FRIDAY), KEDC ASHLAND

Session Description

KEDC ASHLAND
C= Content-Specific Pedagogy   TS= Teaching Strategies     SE= Student Engagement
                                                                                                                                                       
I.  Dr. C. Resor, EKU, Historical Presentation (C)
Title: Living the Utopian Life: The Shakers and Other Communal Societies in the 1800s – 2HRS - AM

Numerous utopian societies were formed in the first half of the 19th century across the United States. What inspired this movement, how were these groups alike and different, and what cause American attitudes toward creating a perfect work change in the late 1800s? Explore this topic with lecture/PowerPoint and primary source activities.
                                                                                                                                                         
II.  National History Day Student Demonstration (SE)

III.  Debra Cullen, SREB (TS)
Title:  Informational Text

Session Times

Start TimeEnd TimeLocationCurrent StudentsMax Students
April 3 2020 09:00 AMApril 3 2020 04:00 PMKEDC ASHLAND2350

PRESIDENTIAL ACADEMY 11 - April 4, 2020 (SATURDAY) KEDC ASHLAND (Rescheduled from 02/07/20 due to Inclement Weather)

Session Description

KEDC LEXINGTON
C= Content-Specific Pedagogy   TS= Teaching Strategies     SE= Student Engagement

I.  Dr. L. Apple, Georgetown, Historical Presentation (C)
    Title:  “The Nation’s Economic Problem Number 1: The American South.”
 
Synopsis
In 1938, President Roosevelt called for a study of economic conditions in the South, stating that he believed it the major social and economic problem. The South responded in two ways. One group, comprised of a few governors, legislators, university presidents, and community leaders proclaimed it as the means for the South to get the attention it needed and deserved. A second group saw it as an attempt to embarrass the South. They blamed northern states and businesses, particularly banks, for the failure of the South to keep pace with other regions. At its worst, their argument cited the burden of intellectually and morally inferior Negroes and a white agrarian working class that was nearly irredeemable.
 
As usual in human events the truth was not one-sided. Study of the topic provides an opportunity to encourage critical thinking skills within ourselves and our students.  That is the major goal of this presentation.


II.  Claire Gwaltney, Kentucky Historical Society Teacher Programs Manager  (TS and SE)
     Title:  Vote for Me!

Do you think everyone should be able to eat ice cream whenever they want? Or that it should be illegal to make kids eat their broccoli? Show off your personality, individuality, and great ideas by running for office! Create a campaign with posters, buttons, and ads to get the word out about what you believe in, wow your voters with fancy speeches, and step through the doors of the Old State Capitol to take your place as Kentucky’s next great politician! This session allows the teachers to experience a KHS Learning Lab and learn how to plan a similar experience for their own students.



Session Times

Start TimeEnd TimeLocationCurrent StudentsMax Students
April 4 2020 09:00 AMApril 4 2020 04:00 PMKEDC LEXINGTON1450

WAITING LIST PRESIDENTIAL ACADEMY 17 - APRIL 18, 2020 (SATURDAY), KEDC LEXINGTON

Session Description

THIS SESSION IS FULL AS OF DEC. 2.  PLEASE REGISTER HERE TO BE PLACED ON A WAITING LIST. YOU WILL BE NOTIFIED IN ORDER OF REGISTRATION IF ANY OF THOSE CURRENTLY ENROLLED, UNENROLL.

Session Name

PRESIDENTIAL ACADEMY 17 - APRIL 18, 2020 (SATURDAY), KEDC LEXINGTON

Description

KEDC LEXINGTON
C= Content-Specific Pedagogy   TS= Teaching Strategies     SE= Student Engagement
                                                                                                                                                       
I.  Dr. D. Eubank, Campbellsville University, (C)
Title:  American Regionalism - What makes the South and the West Unique
The Regionalism presentation will examine the development of a unique Southern and Western outlook that to a great extent still exist today.  The influence of the regions in national politics and their impact on national policy will also be examined. 
 
II.  D. Cullen, SREB, (TS)
Title:  Movement Training


III.  National History Day Student Demonstrtion (SE)

Session Times

Start TimeEnd TimeLocationCurrent StudentsMax Students
April 18 2020 09:00 AMDecember 16 2019 04:00 PMKEDC LEXINGTON1620

PRESIDENTIAL ACADEMY 17 - APRIL 18, 2020 (SATURDAY), KEDC LEXINGTON

Session Description

KEDC LEXINGTON
C= Content-Specific Pedagogy   TS= Teaching Strategies     SE= Student Engagement
                                                                                                                                                       
I.  Dr. D. Eubank, Campbellsville University, (C)
Title:  American Regionalism - What makes the South and the West Unique
The Regionalism presentation will examine the development of a unique Southern and Western outlook that to a great extent still exist today.  The influence of the regions in national politics and their impact on national policy will also be examined. 
 
II.  D. Cullen, SREB, (TS)
Title:  Movement Training


III.  National History Day Student Demonstrtion (SE)

Session Times

Start TimeEnd TimeLocationCurrent StudentsMax Students
April 18 2020 09:00 AMApril 18 2020 04:00 PMKEDC LEXINGTON5050

PRESIDENTIAL ACADEMY 12 - May 2, 2020 (SATURDAY), KEDC LEXINGTON (Rescheduled from 02/08/20 due to Inclement Weather)

Session Description

KEDC LEXINGTON
C= Content-Specific Pedagogy   TS= Teaching Strategies     SE= Student Engagement

I.  Carly Muetterties, UK and Ryan New, Jefferson County Schools (C & TS)
TITLE: Be a Citizen: Connecting America’s Past (1784-1877) to the Present
 
DESCRIPTION: In this workshop, we will explore how teachers can use US History (1784-1877) to propel informed civic action in an out-of-classroom context. In order to complete the inquiry cycle in the Kentucky Academic Standards for Social Studies, students must be able to demonstrate learning by communicating conclusions. There are many ways for students to do so. Connecting history to a modern civic context allows students to communicate conclusions, but also provides teachers an opportunity to: reinforce content understanding through authentic application, allow students to see their ideas play out in the real world, and, likewise, embolden students to see themselves as civic agents. Participants will explore how to provide opportunities for students to take informed action and civically-engage with content in big and small ways. We will use the enduring questions of this period in United States history to consider connections between the issues of the past and civic questions of today, bringing informed civic action into everyday practices.  This workshop is meant to tie the C3 Framework and Inquiry-Based learning to ASPIRE’S yearly objectives.

Session Times

Start TimeEnd TimeLocationCurrent StudentsMax Students
May 2 2020 09:00 AMMay 2 2020 04:00 PMKEDC LEXINGTON5475
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